The sales process, deconstructed 2


There’s an old adage in the newspaper industry that the job of the headline is to get readers to look at the first sentence of the article. The first sentence gets readers to the second sentence and the second sentence gets them to read the rest of the story. It’s reductionist and a bit joking but has more than a grain of truth. And your ads are no different.

The AIDA sales funnel (Attention, Interest, Desire, Action) represents this same point in another way. Getting someone’s attention leads to their interest, that leads to desire, and then the desire leads to action. In either case, the important thing is to have everything in the right order: don’t put the cart before the horse.

But how does the AIDA sales model look in practice, especially with AdWords? Lets take a look.
Baseball Bat Ad
The headline grabs someone’s attention. JustBats sells baseball bats. Pretty clear and definitely grabs a person’s attention: they sell baseball bats.

Then, the first line “Best selection of baseball bats” establishes interest in their product. Interested in buying a bat? You’ll want a good selection.

A shopper is interested now and the next line “free shipping & no hassle returns” makes them want to buy from JustBats. So what comes next?

Action. Click the link and you get their top bats. It’s only another couple clicks to actually buying the bat.

Your process should be similar. Each thing leading into the next, culminating with the purchase. That’s the key to a successful sale.

  • Daniel

    Do you have any suggestions on how to get people’s interest in buying from a specified grocery store? I have thought of many different ways on what to do, but sometimes it seems too much pressure and it worries me that I would scare them away with “marketing pressure”.
    .

  • Aaron

    All of this information is valuable for an upstart advertiser like me, I think this method is actually the best way to get people’s attention in the short span.